Tule Ponds at Tyson
AMPHIBIANS
NATIVE

California Red Legged Frog
Rana aurora draytonii
 
(Special status species protected)

The adult  Rana aurora is 3-6 cm  length. It is reddish brown to gray with many poorly defined dark specks and blotches, that are absent on the back and top of its head.  They have thick, rough skin, and light centered spots on the dorsal surface.

Yellow Legged Frog
Rana boylei
 
(Special status species protected)

These frogs are  3-6 cm in length. They have a small, broad head,  with brownish or gray in coloration with indistinct black markings on the body and limbs. The under surfaces of this frog are yellowish or whitish, the yellow under surface of the thigh giving this species its common name.

Pacific Chorus Frog,  Pacific Tree Frog
Pseudacris regilla

This frog is small, ranging from 2-4 cm in length.  It has large toe pads but limited webbing of the feet.  Its color ranges from green to black  and often has dark spots  on their back and legs.  Adult males have a dark and wrinkled throat. 

 Picture by John Sullivan

Western toad 
Bufo boreas 

The western toad has a light colored stripe that runs down the length of its back.  Its color ranges from gray to green or brown with darker spots.  The toad is most active at night during the summer but diurnal during the winter.   Like most toads they bury into loose soil or hide in other burrows when inactive.

California newt
Taricha torosa 

These large salamanders can reach a length of 15 centimeters.  They have warty skin that is not as slimy as most salamanders.  Their color varies from light brown to black with a characteristic yellow to orange belly.  These newts are very poisonous, so it is not advisable to handle them.  If you do, wash your hands before touching your eyes or mouth.

Arboreal  Salamander
Aneides lugubris
 

 This salamander is purplish-brown with gold or yellow spots on its dorsal side. 

 Picture by C. Brown

California Slender Salamander
Batrachoseps attenuatus 

A salamander that is very thin with a dark brown back.  They have small black vertebral chevrons with black sides and belly.  Their eyes are large, with a diameter that is equal to distance between eye and snout tip. Limbs are very tiny, with small digits that may require magnification to be seen.  They are about 6 cm in length.

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